FP Social Login Name      Password  (forgotten?)     Sign Up Free!
Share your poetry with our community.
Home Poetry Features Poetry Competitions News Contact Us About Us
Poetry Competitions UK

Limericks Workshop

Limericks consist of 5 lines. The first line normally begins with 'There was a . . . ' and ends with a name, person or place. The last line normally has an unusual or far-fetched ending. Take a look at Edward Lear's Limerick for an example.

Read more...


How to Write a Poem for Dad

Father's Day is just round the corner and what better way to show Dad how much you care with a heartfelt poem written by you. For some, writing a poem is as natural as riding a bike, but for the majority of us, apart from needing a pen and paper, we don't know where to start. Well, worry no more as we have put together a handy guide so you can write a wonderful poem for your dad (or father figure). Do remember, anyone can write a poem, it might take a few attempts but eventually you'll have a fantastic poem that your dad will love nearly as much as he loves you.

Read more...


How to Write a Tanka

A Tanka is a Japanese verse form consisting of five lines with a total syllable count of 31. Traditionally Japanese forms are all based around the theme of nature; although these days any theme is acceptable.

Read more...


How to Write an Epistle

An Epistle is an Ancient Roman poetic form that appears commonly in the Bible. The majority of the New Testament is written in Epistles. An Epistle is a poem written in the form of a letter. Traditionally, an Epistle was used to express love, philosophy, religion and morality.

Read more...


How to Write a Kyrielle

The Kyrielle is a medieval French form of poem - it's name is derived from a part of the church liturgy, the kyrie eleison, which is characterised by frequent repetition, as in a refrain of the sentence 'Lord, have mercy upon us'.

Read more...


How to Write a Cinquain

Formed by American poet Adelaide Crapsey around 1909-1910, Cinquains are a form of English Haiku.

Its form is twenty-two syllables over five lines distributed 2,4,6,8,2. The first line will be used to name the subject; line two will describe this subject; the third line will be three action words; line four is a phrase describing the subject, though not in a complete sentence; finally the fifth line will sum up the poem with some impact.


Read more...


How to Write a Reverse Cinquain

If you've written a traditional Cinquain, like the form and fancy a further challenge, why not have a go at writing one, or all of the following Cinquain versions in this workshop?

Read more...


How to Write a Mirror Cinquain

The second adaptation we are looking at is the mirror Cinquain. This is made up of 2 Cinquains, a traditional Cinquain and a reverse Cinquain. These are usually written as 2 5-lined stanzas. You can use the same Cinquain and mirror it, or write two separate Cinquains. The former is the easier option and as this is the advanced Cinquain workshop we suggest you challenge yourself by writing two separate verses.

Read more...


How to Write a Butterfly Cinquain

The third adaptation we are looking at is the butterfly Cinquain. The butterfly Cinquain only has nine lines and it's called a butterfly due to the shape the form creates once written.

Read more...


How to Write a Crown Cinquain

The fourth adaptation we are looking at is the crown Cinquain. The crown Cinquain is 5 traditional Cinquains written as 5 separate stanzas, which create one large poem.

Read more...


How to Write a Garland Cinquain

The final adaptation we are looking at is the garland cinquain. The garland cinquain is 6 traditional cinquains written as 5 separate stanzas, with the sixth cinquain being made up from the previous 5 to create one large poem.

Read more...


How to Write a Ballad

The Ballad first began as a song that tells a story to the listener. These were passed from generation to generation in their musical form. There was a clearly defined growth in the Ballad's popularity in the fifteenth century mainly due to the ability to print them on broadsheets, which would then be sold at fairs and markets.

Read more...


How to Write an Irregular Ode

An ode is a lyrical verse and its name comes from the Greek aeidein, which means to sing or chant. An ode is typically written in praise of, or as a dedication, to someone or something that captures the poet's interest or is an inspiration for their ode.

There are three typical types of odes: the Pindaric ode, the Horatian ode and the Irregular ode. In this workshop we're looking at the structure of the Irregular ode.

Read more...


How to Write an Horatian Ode

An ode is a lyrical verse and its name comes from the Greek aeidein, which means to sing or chant. An ode is typically written in praise of, or as a dedication, to someone or something that captures the poet's interest or is an inspiration for their ode.

There are three typical types of odes: the Pindaric ode, the Horatian ode and the Irregular ode. In this workshop we're looking at the structure of the Horatian ode.

Read more...


How to Write a Pindaric Ode

An ode is a lyrical verse and its name comes from the Greek aeidein, which means to sing or chant. An ode is typically written in praise of, or as a dedication, to someone or something that captures the poet's interest or is an inspiration for their ode.

There are three typical types of odes: the Pindaric ode, the Horatian ode and the Irregular ode. In this poetry writing workshop we're looking at the structure of the Pindaric ode.

Read more...


How to Write a Children's Story

Where do writers find their inspiration? From all around them, every day tasks, journeys and people spark their imaginations. Most writers keep a notepad and pen with them at all times, so they can jot down any interesting places, characters, names or objects they see or hear of.

Read more...


How to Write a Diamante Poem

The diamante, or diamond poem, is a style of poetry made up of 6 lines, using only 13 words and forms the shape of a diamond. The poem starts with one subject and evolves into a different subject, the exact opposite of the starting subject. The diamante poem is classed as a modern poetry style, which was developed by American writer, Iris Tiedt, in the 1960s.

Read more...


How to Write a Love Poem

Anyone can have a go at writing a love poem. Why - because you are writing using your thoughts, feelings and emotions, a testament from your heart. You don't need any fancy equipment, any training or qualifications and everyone experiences love. Love is universal. Anyone can buy a card, some flowers, a box of chocolates, a bottle of after shave, or pick up the bill after a meal out, yet not many have the time or will put in the effort to write a love poem.

Read more...


How to Write a Shakespearean Sonnet

More sophisticated than your average rhyming poetry, the sonnet is sometimes considered to be the most accessible of classic forms.

Read more...


How to Write a Petrarchan Sonnet

The Petrarchan sonnet, also known as the Italian sonnet, originated in Italy in the 13th Century and was associated with the Italian poet Francesco Petrarch.

Read more...


How to Write a Pantoum

The pantoum is renowned as one of the classic forms of poetry. Despite its somewhat strict structure, the pantoum is still a versatile poetic form. Written in four line stanzas called quatrains, pantoums can be written in free verse, metered or rhyme. Originally a Malayan form, the structure of a pantoum is that it is written in couplets, repeating lines in an interlocking pattern. Although due to this nature there is no length restriction to a pantoum, they are generally kept within a few verses, as any longer than this would put stress on the poet's ingenuity and the readers' patience.

Read more...


How to Write a Rondeau

Rondeaux are French lyrical poems, originally developed as a form of medieval courtly music. As song, the form was four stanzas with fully repeating refrains. It was adopted by church musicians as an emotionally rich container, ideal for spiritual worship.

Read more...


How to Write a Triolet

A triolet is a French poetic form dating back to the 13th Century. Unlike its counterparts at the time, this form is short and uses repetition. The triolet has eight lines, each containing eight syllables and a rhyme scheme of ABaAabAB. Lines one, four, and seven are identical. Lines two and eight are identical.

Read more...


How to Write Echo Verse

A poem in which the last syllable or two of a main line is repeated, perhaps with different spelling or meaning, as if an echo; usually this echo will be indented to a point under or beyond the syllable it mimics and will function as an independent line of one or two syllables.

Read more...


How to Write a Terza Rima

Terza rima is a 3-lined rhyme scheme using a chain rhyme in the pattern aba bcb cdc ded. Although no specific line length is required, most terza rima poems in English are written in iambic pentameter. There is no limit to the number of lines, but poems or sections of poems written in terza rima end with either a single line or couplet repeating the rhyme of the middle line of the final tercet.

Read more...


How to Write a Senryu

A senryu is sometimes referred to as the 'human haiku' as it follows the same structure of a haiku, but senryus are written in the present tense and refer to emotions or a trait of human nature.

Read more...


How to Write an Ottava Rima

The ottava rima is a rhyming stanza that is of Italian origin. Originally, the ottava rima was used for long poems on heroic themes. It is thought that Giovanni Boccaccio works contain the earliest known use of the ottava rima form.

Read more...


How to Write a Poem for Mum

What better way to show Mum how much you care with a heartfelt poem written by you. Of course, mums love the flowers, the chocolates, the thoughtful gifts and the breakfast in bed too, but my mum always says 'don't waste your money, it's only Mother's Day, not my birthday'! So, why not write a personal verse to your mum to show her how much you love, care and appreciate her, this Mother's Day.

Read more...


How to Write a Tetractys

The tetractys, made famous by Pythagoras, was created into a modern-day poetic form by Ray Stebbings. A tetractys should express a complete thought, profound, witty or wise using 20 syllables. There is no limit to the number of verses. Rhyming is optional.


Read more...


How to Write a Ballade

A ballade poem is a French form poem, (not to be confused with the "ballad" form, which we offer a separate workshop for!).  A ballade has twenty-eight lines of no set length. It is split into three octaves (eight-lined stanzas) and one quatrain (a four-lined stanza), resulting in 4 stanzas.

Read more...


Poetry Competitions

More details...

Forward Poetry Social

SophieLauren has just posted a poem to Forward Poetry Social!
Click here to read the poem
Click here to view latest activity

Click here to sign up for free...

What's New

Poetry news...
 
Tel: 01733 890099    Fax: 01733 313524    Email: inbox@forwardpoetry.co.uk



Forward Poetry's ethos has always been to act as a bridge to publication rather than a barrier. This, along with our passion for poetry and creative writing, has seen a humble family business evolve into the biggest publisher of new poetry in the world. We understand that poetry is subjective, that everyone writes in a different style and that what one person can love, another can hate! Our collections showcase a variety of themes, writing styles and poets from all walks of life. They are carefully edited and compiled to celebrate and complement the craft that all of our contributors enjoy poetry.

Read more...








Forward Poetry, Remus House, Coltsfoot Drive, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE2 9BF

Home | News | About Us | Poetry Competitions | Winners | Workshops | Upload Entry | Events | Publication Timeline | Meet the Poets | Poet Publish | Contact Us

Bonacia Ltd is a Limited Liability company incorporated in England and Wales with registered number 05368980. Our VAT registration number is 102781343. Our site uses cookies to store information. By viewing this site, you agree to our Cookie Policy and Terms & Conditions.

© Forward Poetry - Poetry Publishers UK